What the Elect say and do, especially when they are leaders, matters.

Fr Peter, one of the originators of the British Province of the Confraternity of Catholic

Fr Peter, one of the originators of the British Province of the Confraternity of Catholic

Fr. Peter Edwards, parish priest at St Joseph’s New Malden is the leader of a large parish in Southwark, who isn’t afraid to take criticism on the chin and who rises above it in all that he does and says. He’s not afraid of swimming upstream (another Catholic salmon!!) against a tide of carping parishioners who question his choice to remain faithful to the Tradition and truths of the Faith and who cannot and will not understand the importance of standing firm on these teachings. For this (amongst other things) I love, respect and support him. His beautiful and prayerful Masses are uplifting, putting Christ front and centre without fail no matter which Mass I attend, each and every time. He gives me a sense of an unwavering love of Jesus that will never be swayed .

How do you view your shepherd? Do you support him or criticize him?

The ensuing homily is one of  Cardinal Vincent Nichols, delivered at the Easter Vigil Mass at Westminster Cathedral. Bold emphasis is my own-in a show of support of what he shared:

The full text of Cardinal Nichols the Easter Vigil on 4 April 2015.


Our Vigil this evening started in a very deep darkness, and in many ways that is a harsh reality because there is much darkness in our lives. With the violence in Kenya, the wretchedness of those who have been forced away from their homes, and now in Northern Iraq, millions of displaced people. Think of the anxiety, the loneliness, the depression, jealousy and greed that characterise our lives.

Yet tonight, a fire blazed, there is something very primal about a fire, and for us we can see it as symbolising that first power of God and the Holy Spirit that hovered over the chaos and brought forth the cosmos and ordered world. The fire stands for the beginnings of the work of creation, for the original creativity of God who is meant be seen in energy and purpose, and inventiveness and goodness. From that original fire, now has come forth a single light.

That fire, as we heard in the readings, is struggling to survive through the unfaithfulness of people. Now it comes, a single light, which is inextinguishable, even by death, and that light has spread among us, from one to another, filling this place, becoming the Church. The light is Christ, the light that conquers darkness, the light we celebrate this night, that he is risen, and he lives with us.

How in our lives does this victory of Christ come to be real? Yes, it becomes real by God’s grace working within us as we strive to follow the person of Jesus; but how can we express that precisely this evening? By this light we are to live fully each day and always with a hope that is sure and certain. So we open our hearts to the present, a present that is full of the future. Tonight that it what we try to do; we try to grasp the light, to make it our own, just as we grasp the candle. This is my light. We open our hearts to receive the hope; a hope that St Paul spoke about; a hope that we are bound to Christ and therefore share his resurrection. And we resolve to seize the day, to live the day, to live every day to the full. You can put it like this, “this rising of the sun each morning is the rising of the Son of God and for that day I live by his light and exceed everything in his light.”

My mother used to say, at the beginning of every day, “This is the day the Lord has made, so let us rejoice and be glad in it, accept it, and live it to the full.” But we make each day in the light of a sure and certain hope because we know that all things will be fulfilled in Christ and nothing of what is true worth, nothing that reflects the truth and the love and the compassion of God, will ever be lost.

In this light of the risen Christ, we live fully each day with a hope for the future that is sure and certain.

So often today we are tempted just to live for the moment, see what pleasure it can give us and not know about tomorrow. Sometimes it’s suggested that religion tempts us to abandon the present for a fanciful dream, a fanciful future that is detached from this day. Our faith does not do that. We live this day through God’s love and mercy, whatever its reality, facing its greatness and its failure. So for us, faith in Jesus is not escapism.

We are profoundly committed to the day, to this world, to God’s world, to serving it in the light of His truth. And equally, our faith is not an ideology. Ideologies always want to destroy what is in their way.

Our faith is not an ideology; it embraces what is in front of us only to heal and redeem through Christ, and with him in our hands and our hearts, that we play our part…

He is risen. Alleluia. Amen

Quoted from The Catholic Herald

Lenten Fasting and Abstinence.



“A story’s end changes the meaning of every page.”

This beautiful young woman inspires me more than I can say. She is a wife and mother of four young children, and she has advanced, incurable kidney cancer. Can you give her 2 minutes and 44 seconds to teach you something amazing, eternal, real?

Click the link below to meet her.


“A story’s end changes the meaning of every page.”

The Promise is fulfilled.

‘The days are coming’, says the Lord, when I will fulfil the promise I made…’ Jeremiah 33:14



A promise, kept or broken, is a very important piece in the mosaic of relationships.

It evokes expectation in the heart of the one who receives it, because a promise is grounded in trust.

Trust, hope, expectancy, are the foundation and bedrock of the lives of a pilgrim people. In setting out on our journey to the Kingdom, we commit ourselves to a lifetime Advent, for on the way, we will meet our own hungers and thirst…our own deserts. We will come face-to-face with desire and disappointment. But, with promise in our ‘travel bag’, we have the courage to strain forward toward fulfilment, the Journey’s end.

Jeremiah is a man of promise. He is an instrument of hope and fulfilment. Reluctant to speak the name of the Lord, it was his trust in the promise of God that enabled him to loosen his grasp on self-concern and become the utterance of God.

We too, can trust in the Promise – the faithful love of God. We too, can become prophets and instruments of love, hope and justice in the world. The days are here. The time is now. The promise is fulfilled.

(Commentary is from an unknown source. This reflection was part of an Advent service we attended)

Set apart, marked, driven out, persecuted…and not one of the Western leaders condemn these atrocities!

Share this sign as a sign of solidarity with the Christians in Iraq

Share this sign as a sign of solidarity with the Christians in Iraq

Just in case you have come across this sign on social media sites and are not sure what it represents I thought I’d post it tonight in support of Christians in Mosul who are being crucified, murdered, tortured and forced out of Iraq for being Christian.The Pope has spoken out in support of these Christians, seemingly ‘forgotten’ by the Western leaders. Read articles here and here to understand the wider picture of the atrocities unfolding so far from us here in the West.


Sanctify me, Save me, Inebriate me…..


Pentecost: A Beautiful Illumination. Does your heart long for beauty?

On first sight of this painting, my heart skipped a beat and caught my breath for just a few moments. This has only ever happened to me once before, in Rome at the Northern Gate, at the church just inside the gate on the right hand side. It was there that we were blessed to join in the celebration of a Baptism.

There,  I came upon a painting of Our Lady at the Annunciation and its beauty brought me to tears in an instant. The shadow of the Divine was in that painting……..just as it is here in this one. I felt it at the core of my being.

I am an artist in waiting , painting and creating along the journey of Life. Searching for the Divine in the beauty of Christian art. This is one example of just one of those paintings. The exciting thing is that there is much beauty to discover and reflect upon. (This is one endeavour on my bucket list)

In her post, Elizabeth Scalia praises the merits of the little publication MAGNIFICAT. Not only does this reach out to adults but to children also. Take a peek at MAGNIFIKID . The slogan for the Magnifikid copy is encouraging: ‘To bring the Mass and prayer closer to the children’.

By Elizabeth Scalia (The Anchoress)

I first saw this beautiful painting and the reflection when visiting the blog CATHOLIC PURE AND SIMPLE

Illumination from Hours of the Usage of Rome, French School, 16th Century

Illumination from Hours of the Usage of Rome, French School, 16th Century

Sometimes the heart just longs for beauty. June’s cover of Magnificat Magazine took my breath away. That’s “Pentecost” an illumination from a book of Hours from the 16th Century, and this is what Pierre-Marie Dumont writes of it:

Shown at prayer, Mary intercedes for her “daughter” [the church] at the moment of her birth at Pentecost, just as she will constantly intercede for her to the end of time. Kneeling in the right foreground is Saint Peter, the first pope, wearing the mozetta in cloth of gold. Opposite him is Saint John, a handsome reddish-blond young man. In the middle ground, between Mary and Peter, stands Saint James. The first bishop of the Church, in the see of Jerusalem, he is recognizable by his ermine mozetta, symbol of the episcopacy. In a most stunning way, all are clad in white. For, at Pentecost, the Apostles underwent a kind of baptism. Like catechumens, they have cast off their old clothes to be robed anew in white. Through this divestiture and reclothing, the artist seeks to express a radical change in function and vocation; to receive this immaculate uniform is a royal, priestly and prophetic investiture. But further, the artist represents a gathering in the Upper Room where all are clothed in “dazzling white” (Luke 9:29) just as Christ at the Transfiguration…the miniaturist here offers us a vision of the glory of the Church, encapsulating at the same time both its divine origins as well as its fulfillment as the Body of Christ.

I love it. And for me the Magnificat is invaluable.

How do you feel about evangelising?


A need to recognise the dangerous ‘new secularism’

There are Christians who are incarcerated for not denouncing their faith. There are those who are forced to flee their country of birth. There are those who have died and still more are awaiting their death, because they refuse to denounce their faith in Jesus.

We should not only be praying for these fellow brothers and sisters but standing side-by-side voicing our concern about what is going on against our Faith in the world. How do we do this? By  writing to the Prime Minister, writing to the representative member of parliament in your constituency and raising awareness amongst Christians about this attack.

This morning I came across this article over at Christian Concern. A very important article about the ‘dangerous new secularism’. It’s real and  insidious. We need to take notice and stand up to denounce this trend. I have highlighted words and phrases that stand out as critical. Read this. I would appreciate your comments and thoughts on this article.Christians need to recognise that the ‘new secularism’ is trying to undermine and destroy their faith, a Free Church minister in Scotland has said.

David Robertson, who is also the Director of the Solas Centre for Public Christianity, warned about the difference between secularists who are “simply about the separation of church and state” and a “new secularism which is much more militant and dangerous”.

Writing for the website Christian Today, Robertson explained: “The vast majority of the posts on secular message boards are anti-religious.


“The main purpose is to attack religion in general, Christianity in particular and in very particular the Catholic Church and evangelicals.”

He said this attitude “quickly degenerates into personal abuse” if the comments are challenged.

The new secularism appears to come with ‘values’, Robertson argued, such as being pro-abortion, pro-euthanasia and pro-homosexuality.


“Dare any one in public life suggest for example that marriage should be between a man and a woman and they are automatically decried as a homophobic bigot even (or perhaps especially) if they are homosexual and atheist”, he said.

Robertson commented: “The New Secularists want the complete neuterisation and privatisation of religion. They want only their views and values to be taught and allowed in public life.”

“We need to recognise the new secularism for what it is – an attempt to undermine and destroy Christianity.


“We need to stand against its fundamentalism and we need to stand up for the poor, the young, the disabled and the marginalised (who most need the Good News), by proclaiming the gospel of Christ against the elitism and intolerance of our new fundamentalist atheists”, he said.

The last Census of 2011 found that less than 78,000 people (or 0.14 per cent of the population) identified themselves as secularist, atheist, humanists, agnostics or as a free thinker.

Colin Hart, Director of The Christian Institute, said of atheists: “This tiny group of people lays great claims to have their beliefs at the front and centre of our national life.”

“What the atheists lack in numbers, they certainly make up for in terms of their influence and boldness. They understand that their beliefs are a worldview which they are determined to impose on everyone else”, he added.

Quoted from The Christian Institute 

New Life.



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